As an artist I am drawn to the personal effects of our ‘domestic landscapes’ which imprint our psyche, often connecting us to a memory, person or place. Over time, a personal iconography has evolved from the commonplace objects depicted in my still-life paintings. They form the visual vocabulary for narrative in my work. I find it intriguing how these approachable symbols evoke a viewer response that is uniquely personal and universal at the same time.
Throughout my career symbolism is a constant thread in my work, indiscriminate of the topic. Solid composition, studying the effects of light across objects and exploring the duplicitous nature of shadows, which reveal and deceive at the same time, are my primary formal concerns.
Occasionally I’m compelled to paint another striking Texas sky, or portrait of a loved one, but find I always return to still-life.

“In order to get to something universal you must be very specific.” – Max Beckman

 

As an artist I am drawn to the personal effects of our ‘domestic landscapes’ which imprint our psyche, often connecting us to a memory, person or place. Over time, a personal iconography has evolved from the commonplace objects depicted in my still-life paintings. They form the visual vocabulary for narrative in my work. I find it intriguing how these approachable symbols evoke a viewer response that is uniquely personal and universal at the same time.
Throughout my career symbolism is a constant thread in my work, indiscriminate of the topic. Solid composition, studying the effects of light across objects and exploring the duplicitous nature of shadows, which reveal and deceive at the same time, are my primary formal concerns.
Occasionally I’m compelled to paint another striking Texas sky, or portrait of a loved one, but find I always return to still-life.
“In order to get to something universal you must be very specific.” – Max Beckman