As an artist I love to express myself through still-lifes. I am drawn to the personal effects of ‘domestic landscapes’ which establish connections to time, place and experience that can be uniquely personal and oddly universal at the same time; often triggering memories charged with a vast array of emotions. A personal iconography has evolved from objects that have imprinted me. They form the visual vocabulary for narrative in my work; providing an approachable means to symbolically express observations of human nature. I hope others connect with my work and sense a response to the familiar as well. Solid composition, studying the effects of light across objects and exploring the duplicitous nature of shadows, which reveal and deceive at the same time, are my primary formal concerns.
Occasionally I’m compelled to portray the beauty of a Texas sky, or portrait of a loved one, but find I always return to still-life.

“In order to get to something universal you must be very specific.” – Max Beckman

 

As an artist I love to express myself through still-lifes. I am drawn to the personal effects of ‘domestic landscapes’ which establish connections to time, place and experience that can be uniquely personal and oddly universal at the same time; often triggering memories charged with a vast array of emotions. A personal iconography has evolved from objects that have imprinted me. They form the visual vocabulary for narrative in my work; providing an approachable means to symbolically express observations of human nature. I hope others connect with my work and sense a response to the familiar as well. Solid composition, studying the effects of light across objects and exploring the duplicitous nature of shadows, which reveal and deceive at the same time, are my primary formal concerns.
Occasionally I’m compelled to portray the beauty of a Texas sky, or portrait of a loved one, but find I always return to still-life.

“In order to get to something universal you must be very specific.” – Max Beckman