As an artist I am drawn to the personal effects of our ‘domestic landscapes’ which imprint our psyche, often connecting us to a memory, person or place. Over time, a personal iconography has evolved from the commonplace objects depicted in my still-life paintings. They form the visual vocabulary for narrative in my work. These approachable symbols evoke a response that is uniquely personal and universal at the same time.
I am increasingly interested in the metaphor of shadows as a contextual focus; their ability to reveal, mimic, loom over, shelter, confuse and deceive. Depicting their duplicitous nature provides an additional layer of subtext to explore.

Studying light and its altering of color are formally engaging for me. While exaggerating each slightly affords me a visual reality that resides somewhere between realism and surrealism.

“In order to get to something universal you must be very specific.” – Max Beckman

 

As an artist I am drawn to the personal effects of our ‘domestic landscapes’ which imprint our psyche, often connecting us to a memory, person or place. Over time, a personal iconography has evolved from the commonplace objects depicted in my still-life paintings. They form the visual vocabulary for narrative in my work. These approachable symbols evoke a response that is uniquely personal and universal at the same time.
I am increasingly interested in the metaphor of shadows as a contextual focus; their ability to reveal, mimic, loom over, shelter, confuse and deceive. Depicting their duplicitous nature provides an additional layer of subtext to explore.
Studying light and its altering of color are formally engaging for me. While exaggerating each slightly affords me a visual reality that resides somewhere between realism and surrealism.

“In order to get to something universal you must be very specific.” – Max Beckman